Items where Author is "Millard, David"

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Number of items: 41.

Resource

Review of Social Networking Technologies
These slides are the review slides for COMP6051 and COMP6052 Social Networking Technologies, and show the significant lessons learned for each part of the course, and an example exam question and marks scheme.

Shared with: University

Social Media Analytics: Trust and Power
In this lecture for a second year interdisciplinary course (part of the curriculum innovation programme) We explore the scope of social media analytics and look at two aspects in depth: Analysing for influence (looking at factors such as network structure, propagation of content and interaction), and analysing for trust (looking at different methods including policy, provenance and reputation - both local and global). The lecture notes include a number of short videos, which cannot be included here for copy-write reasons.

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Event Driven Programming in Java
Event driven programming is a way of writing a program that works by responding to things happening (rather than executing a preplanned series of tasks). It is most often used to manage more advanced user interactions, such as GUI programs. In this session we look at how event driven programming works in Java GUIs, as both an introduction to events (using MouseListeners), and also to the way that GUI programs are constructed.

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System Design: UML Class Diagrams
In this session we look at UML Class Diagrams and how they fit into both the family of UML models, and also the software engineering process. We look at some basic features of class diagrams including properties, operations, associations, generalisation, aggregation and composition.

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System Design: Introduction to Group Work
In this course you will learn a number of different ways in which to describe a system, at both a high level (using SSM) and a low level (using UML). The main coursework for the course is to work in groups and use these techniques on a case study of your collective choosing. In this session we put the students into groups, run a brainstorming activity on potential businesses, and outline some of the group activities that will be required over the course.

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Systems Design: Introduction to Systems
This is the introductory slides for Comp1209 Systems Design. In the first half we explain the structure of the course, and in the second we give a brief introduction to Systems (using Bloodhound SSC as a class exercise)

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Programming Principles: Polymorphism
In this session we build on inheritance and look at overriding methods and dynamic binding. Together these give us Polymorphism - the third pillar of Object Oriented Programming - and a very powerful feature that allows us to build methods that deal with superclasses, but whose calls get redirected when we pass in sub-classes.

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Programming Principles: The Java Library
In this session we point you at the Java Library, and go into some more details on how Strings work. We also introduce the HashMap class (a very useful type of collection).

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Programming Principles: Collections and Iterators
In this session we look at how we can use collection objects like ArrayList as a more advanced type of array. We also introduce the idea of generics (forcing a collection to hold a particular type) and see how Java handles the autoboxing and unboxing of primitives. Finally we look at Iterators, a common design pattern for dealing with iteration over a collection.

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Programming Principles: Encapsulation and Constructors
In this session we look at the public and protected keywords, and the principle of encapsulation. We also look at how Constructors can help you initialise objects, while maintaining the encapsulation principle.

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Programming Principles: Methods
In this session we look at how to create more powerful objects through more powerful methods. We look at parameters and call by value vs. call by reference; return types; and overloading.

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Programming Principles: Computational Thinking
In this session we look at how to think systematically about a problem and create a solution. We look at the definition and characteristics of an algorithm, and see how through modularisation and decomposition we can then choose a set of methods to create. We also compare this somewhat procedural approach, with the way that design works in Object Oriented Systems,

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Programming Principles: Variables, Primitives, Objects and Scope
In this session we look more closely at the way that Java deals with variables, and in particular with the differences between primitives (basic types like int and char) and objects. We also take an initial look at the scoping rules in Java, which dictate the visibility of variables in your program

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Programming Principles: Introduction to Java
In this lecture we look at key concepts in Java: how to write, compile and run Java programs, define a simple class, create a main method, and use if/else structures to define behaviour.

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Programming Principles: Starting Out
In this lecture we describe the structure of the Programming Principles course at Southampton, look at the definitions and paradigms of programming, and take a look ahead to the key things that we will be covering in the weeks ahead.

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Review: Social Media and Abstract Nouns
The revision slides for our Social Media course, contains major lessons learned throughout the course, and an example exam question (on trust).

Shared with: University

Privacy
Privacy is a concept that has been with us for hundreds of years, but it is relatively recently (the last 130 years or so) that it has been seen as something that needs protection as a legal right. Technology has presented many challenges to privacy, from the printing press to recording devices to communication hacking, but Social Media seems to present something new - a phenomenon of people giving up their personal information to an extent that would be considered extraordinary just a generation ago. In this lecture we look at attitudes and behaviors around privacy, see how social norms have shaped our expectations of privacy, and how we have come to trade our privacy for value, making complex (and sometimes ill-informed) risk decisions. We will also explore how people really behave on Social Media systems, to see whether we (as a society) should be concerned about modern attitudes to privacy, and whether there are any advantages that might balance that concern. Finally we look at how technology can be applied to the problems of privacy, both as a preventative measure, but also by aiding transparency and helping people to make better privacy decisions. These slides were updated for 2014.

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The Web 2.0 Development Survival Guide
Building software for Web 2.0 and the Social Media world is non-trivial. It requires understanding how to create infrastructure that will survive at Web scale, meaning that it may have to deal with tens of millions of individual items of data, and cope with hits from hundreds of thousands of users every minute. It also requires you to build tools that will be part of a much larger ecosystem of software and application families. In this lecture we will look at how traditional relational database systems have tried to cope with the scale of Web 2.0, and explore the NoSQL movement that seeks to simplify data-storage and create ultra-swift data systems at the expense of immediate consistency. We will also look at the range of APIs, libraries and interoperability standards that are trying to make sense of the Social Media world, and ask what trends we might be seeing emerge.

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Trust
Trust is a complex philosophical, social and technical notion, but it underlies many of our digital interactions including e-commerce and collective intelligence. In this lecture we will look at how different disciplines, including Psychology, Sociology and Economics have come to understand Trust through the lens of their own studies, aims and goals, and will explore how computer scientists and software engineers have implemented trust models based on policy, provenance and reputation. We will take a closer look at both Global and Local reputation-based trust, and see how assumptions of transitivity and asymmetry are useful. Finally we will explore trust issues around the largest known store of human knowledge: the Wikipedia

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Power and Influence
Like any form of human interaction and communication it is possible to view Social Media as a means for the powerful to influence and control the less powerful. But what is power on social media, how might we measure or affect it, and does it translate to the real world? In this lecture we will look at the philosophical definitions of power, and explore how it has been analysed in social networks and social media systems. We will also look at the characteristics of social networks that impact on power, including Homophily, Heterophily, CyberBalkanization and Thresholds of Collective Action. Finally we will ask what evidence there is that power in social media can affect what goes on in the real world, and explore some real and fictional examples of protest to see what the consequences of social media actually are on sometimes violent political debate.

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The New Web Literacy
Web 2.0 is sometimes described as the read/write web, giving everyday users the chance to create and share information as well as to consume information created by others. Social media systems are built on this foundation of participation and sharing, but what is the mindset of these users, and are they quite so everyday as we might suppose? The skills and attitudes held by users can be described as their literacy, and there has been a lot of debate over the last few years about how to describe these literacies, and design for them. One field that has been changed radically by this notion is Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) where a fierce debate has raged about the potential of a new generation of highly literate digital natives, and Edupunks have argued for open and personal systems that challenge traditional models of institutional control. In this session we look at the arguments surrounding digital literacy and examine TEL as an example of how social media can change an application domain.

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A Brief History of the Web
The Web is now so ingrained in our lives that it is easy to forget that it is less than twenty years old. But the History of Web goes back much further, to the pioneering technologists who built the first hypertext systems and the men and women before them who imagined great libraries of interconnected information that would augment human intellect and drive civilization forward. In this lecture we will explore the pre-digital origins of the Web, look at how it developed into the mass communication system we have today, and speculate on the next stages of its evolution in the context of Web Science and Social Media.

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Introduction to the Social Networking Systems Course
These are the Introduction slides for Comp6051 Social Networking Technologies. They outline the structure of the course, and give a (very brief) overview of the topics covered.

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Requirements Capture: Using UML Use Cases
This is a presentation for our year one INFO1008 course of Computational Systems. It covers the need for requirements capture and the difficulty of building a specification based on user information. We present UML Use Cases and Use Case diagrams as a way of capturing requirements from the users point of view in a semi-structured way.

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Chasing EdShare
A presentation on EdShare given to the Bloodhound @University Group in Bristol in July 2010.

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And 2 more...
The Modelling Journey
These were slides developed as part of our work with the JISC Community Engagement Team and CETIS to introduce people to different forms of system modelling, including scenarios and personas, soft systems methods, UML (Use cases, activity diagrams and sequence diagrams), BMPN and EA modelling with Archimate.

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Project Management: A Tale of Fact, Failure and Fiction
This is a presentation given to 3rd year Project students on our BSc degree programmes to help them project manage their 3rd year dissertations. It covers three practical methods. Fact: Skills Audits to help make projects realistic. Failure: Risk Assessment to help with contingency planning. Fiction: Gantt Charts to help with managing time and effort.

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Multimedia Systems Overview - What is a Conference?
These are the introduction slides for the Multimedia Systems Course in ECS. They introduce the unusual structure of the course (it is run as a student conference), and explains the shape and purpose of an academic conference.

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Participating in a Conference
This presentation is for students on the 3rd year ECS Multimedia course where students run their own conference, and submit and review papers. In this presentation we look at the different ways that you can participate in an academic conference: Paper, poster and demo, and give some advice on each.

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What is Multimedia
This presentation is for students on the 3rd year ECS Multimedia course where students run their own conference, and submit and review papers. This presentation introduces them to the topic of Multimedia Systems, and explains a number of key areas of the subject.

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The Anatomy of a Paper
This presentation is for students on the 3rd year ECS Multimedia course where students run their own conference, and submit and review papers. In this presentation we look at how to write and structure an academic paper, including how to include references to academic work.

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Researching an Academic Paper
This presentation is for students on the 3rd year ECS Multimedia course where students run their own conference, and submit and review papers. In this presentation we look at how to do the research behind an academic paper, finding sources of information and planning your reading. We also look at plagiarism, and see a number of different ways in which you can reference and include the work of others.

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The Conference Review Process
This presentation is for students on the 3rd year ECS Multimedia course where students run their own conference, and submit and review papers. In this presentation we explain the academic review process, look at the structure of a review, and give some examples of positive and negative reviews.

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Writing Proposals
This presentation is for students on the 3rd year ECS Multimedia course where students run their own conference, and submit and review papers. The presentation explains how students should write a proposal for the course, and gives them examples of topics and types of paper that they might want to think about.

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Revising a Conference Paper
This presentation is for students on the 3rd year ECS Multimedia course where students run their own conference, and submit and review papers. In this presentation we explain how to interpret reviews, find underlying problems, and make changes that will address them.

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Software Engineering Models
This presentation gives a high level introduction to modelling in software engineering. It looks in detail at how to model behaviour, in particular using UML Activity Diagrams.

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Building Software Solutions
This presentation explains how we move from a problem definition to an algorithmic solution using simple tools like noun verb analysis. It also looks at how we might judge the quality of a solution through coupling, cohesion and generalisation.

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Control Structures
These slides describe how control structures (if/else and loops) are used within algorithms. It includes a description of conditionals (>, ==, etc.) and logic (AND, OR, etc).

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Sequences and Modules
This is a presentation introducing students to algorithmic concepts such as sequencing, pseudocode and modularity. It includes a class exercise to define the algorithm to make a cup of tea.

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Systems in the Small
This is a presentation introducing students to the idea of Algorithms. It is intended for students who are technical, but are not Computer Science students. The presentation covers definitions, characteristics, complexity and some simple examples.

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This list was generated on Tue Jul 29 15:45:28 2014 BST.