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Number of items: 85.

B

Lecture 1 - Starting out
What is Programming? A useful definition Object Orientation (and it’s counterparts) Thinking OO Programming Blocks Variables Logic Data Structures Methods

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Lecture 2 - Java
Programming Overview The JVM (The Java Virtual Machine) A brief look at Structure Class Method Statement Magic incantations main() output Coding a Dog Programming Principle(1) If and Boolean operations Coding a Bank Account Quick look at ToolBox

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Lecture 3 - Objects Ahoy
Variables - Objects and Primitives, Quick look at scope

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Lecture 4 - Methods and Stuff
Banking Parameters and arguments Passing Objects Primitives Returning Getters and Setters

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Lecture 5 - Constructors
Constructors With one parameter With two parameters Overloading Constructors and methods

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Lecture 7 - Going Loopy
Looping while do while for Arrays indexes For each loop

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Lecture 8 - über-Arrays
ArrayList ArrayList vs Array Declaration Insertion Access Removal Wrapper classes Iterator object

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Lecture 12 - Scope
Instance Variables Local variables Cool 3D Modelling! “this” keyword

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Lecture 13 - It runs in the family
Inheritance Code duplication Super classes Constructors Polymorphic collections “Anywhere a super class is, a sub class can go” Casting A great deception

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Lecture 14 - Exploring Polymorphism
Which methods are where? Overriding Calling super’s methods Coupling and cohesion

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Lecture 15 - Interface this
A quick word about abstract How a class interfaces Making Pets The Deadly Diamond of Death Interfaces (not interfaces)

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Lecture 16 - I can't hear you through the static
Static Types of methods Instance Static Example Calling Static methods Why Static Final

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Lectures 17 and 18 - Exceptions - when it all goes wrong
Exceptions An Example The Throws keyword Try and Catch The flow Multiple exceptions Finally How exceptions are thrown What the complier checks Handle or Defer Recovery Writing your own

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Research on Social Network Sites
A bibliography of research on Social Network web sites. The research contained below is focused specifically on social network sites (or "social networking" sites). Some of this is connected to social media, social software, Web2.0, social bookmarking, educational technologies, communities research, etc. but this is not the organizing focus and not everything related to these other topics is included here. This list is not methodologically or disciplinarily organized. There is work here from communications, information science, anthropology, sociology, economics, political science, cultural studies, computer science, etc.

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C

JavaScript Prototypes, Objects and Classes
The full story on the JavaScript object model, and how prototypes are used instead of classes

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JavaScript and the DOM
A look at the HTML Document Object Model, and how JavaScript uses it to manipulate the contents of Web pages. Links are provided to DOM tutorials that give more detailed explanations.

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand "Web Science" Lecture 1
Lecture 1: Introduction to Web Science Lecture slides and video by Directors of Web Science Research Initiative (Wendy Hall and Tim Berners-Lee)

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand "Web Science" Lecture 2
Lecture 2: Personal Privacy and State Interference Lecture slides and video by Danny Weitzner.

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And 4 more...
COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand "XML" Lecture 1
Lecture 1: Basic XML & HTML5 Lecture slides and exercises for reading and writing basic XML (without DTDs).

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand "XML" Lecture 2
Lecture 1: DTDs and XML Structure Verification Lecture slides and exercises for validating XML with DTDs.

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand "XML" Lecture 3
Lecture 3: DOM and XPath Lecture slides and exercises for using DOM and XPath to access material within an XML database or document.

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand "XML" Lecture 5
Lecture 5: XLink and XPointer Lecture slides and exercises for using XLink and XPointer to link to and control material within an XML database or document.

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand "XML" Lecture 6
Lecture 6: RDF and Metadata Lecture slides and exercises for using RDF to describe Web resources

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Conways Game of Life JavaScript Exercise
For students learning JavaScript programming, this exercise sets out a fairly complete template for a DHTML implementation of Life. Students have to program the missing sections of code and attempt the extra features described. Only I have the password to unlock the solution!

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And 3 more...
Introduction to JavaScript Programming
These are the resources for an introductory lecture in JavaScript programming. Exercises are provided to practice simple JavaScript programming, including a template for a DHTML implementation of Conway's Game of Life (with encrypted solution).

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JQuery, JSON & AJAX
The traditional web model requires each user interaction to trigger an HTTP client-server interaction that creates a new browser page. AJAX and other techniques allow the Web developer to interact with the server without the expense of recreating a new DOM.

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JQuery: A JavaScript Library
JQuery is a JavaScript library that encourages the separation of content, behavior and presentation.

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JavaScript Background References
Background material for learning JavaScript, including User Guide and Reference manual plus the JavaScript Shell and the JQuery library.

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JavaScript and the DOM
A look at the HTML Document Object Model, and how JavaScript uses it to manipulate the contents of Web pages. Links are provided to DOM tutorials that give more detailed explanations.

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And 9 more...

Stylesheets: CSS and XSL
Lecture slides and exercises for using stylesheets on HTML or XML.

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And 4 more...
What is the Web? The Web Architecture
The Introductory Lecture is a discussion about "What is the Web". It involves lots of calling out TLAs and writing them on the blackboard, dividing things into servers, clients, protocols, formats, and the punchline is that the one unique and novel thing about the web is the hypertext link. This follows naturally into the Web architecture - the answer to the question "what is the web".

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And 2 more...
COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand "XML" Lecture 7 - RSS
Lecture 7: RSS, Content Syndication and Aggregation Lecture slides and exercises for using RSS to syndicate Web resources. This lecture looks at how content syndication has become a key part of Web information dissemination, how the RSS language(s) has emerged as a result of that process and demonstrates the various options for syndicating and aggregating material - server-side transforms and client-side widgets.

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D

And 4 more...
COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 1
Lecture 1: The Pioneers and History of Hypertext (pre-WWW) Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: Bush: As We may Think; Engelbart: NLS and A Framework for Augmenting Human Intelligence; Nelson: Xanalogical Structure; Conklin: A Survey of Hypertext; Halasz 1987: Reflections on NoteCards: Seven Issues for the Next Generation of Hypermedia Systems; Berners-Lee 1994 The World-Wide Web.

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 2
Lecture 1: Contributions of Pre WWW Research: Open Hypermedia Systems Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: Industrial Strength Hypermedia: Requirements for a Large Engineering Enterprise (Malcolm et al. 1991); Towards An Integrated Information Environment With Open Hypermedia Systems (Davis et al. 1992); Unifying Strategies for Web Augmentation (Bouvin 1999); Hyper-G (Adapted from Lowe and Hall); OHP:A Draft Proposal for a Standard Open Hypermedia Protocol (Davis et al. 1996); XML Linking (DeRose 99)

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 3
Lecture 3: Contributions of Pre WWW Research: Spatial Hypertext and Temporal Hypertext Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: Spatial [SPATIAL] VIKI: spatial hypertext supporting emergent structure (Marshall, 94); Towards Geo-Spatial Hypermedia: Concepts and Prototype Implementation, (Gronbaek et al. 2002); Cyber Geography and Better Search Engines; [TEMPORAL] Anticipating SMIL 2.0: The Developing Cooperative Infrastructure for Multimedia on the Web (Rutledge 1999); Its About Time: Link Streams as Continuous Metadata (Page et al., 2001); Everything You Wanted to Know About MPEG-7:Part 1 (Nack & Lindsay 1999)

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 4
Lecture 4: Ontological Hypertext and the Semantic Web Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: Conceptual linking: Ontology-based Open Hypermedia (Carr et al. 2001); CS AKTiveSpace: Building a Semantic Web Application (Glaser et al., 2004); The Semantic Web Revisited (Shadbolt, Hall and Berners-Lee, 2006); Mind the Semantic Gap (Millard et al., 2005).

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 5
Lecture 5: Web 2.0 and Social Hypertext Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: What Is Web 2.0 Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software . Tim O'Reilly (2005); Web 2.0: Hypertext by Any Other Name? (Millard & Ross, 2006)

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 6
Lecture 6: Where are all the links taking us: Web Science Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: The Literati (The Cyberspace and critical theory website) (Eastgate website); Pervasive Hypertext at Southampton and at Aarhus; Adaptive Hypertext - The Next Big Thing: (De Bra & Chepegin, 2004); Web Science: Creating a Science of the Web (Berners-Lee, Hall, Hendler, Shadbolt & Weitzner, 2006).

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How to Review a Paper
How to Review a Paper: A guide for newcomers and a refresher for the experienced.

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Things to do with your first personal tutorial
This is an idea list of things you might wish to talk about with your personal tutees in the first few tutorials. It originates from ECS (Dave de Roure and Hugh Davis in particular) so some of the ideas might be particular to that School. If you have suggestions you would wish to have added please email them to hcd@ecs.soton.ac.uk, or please feel free to copy any parts of the document and make a list specific to your school. Please enter the new list in EdShare!

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G

TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 10: Text Mining
This class introduces basics of web mining and information retrieval including, for example, an introduction to the Vector Space Model and Text Mining. Guest Lecturer: Dr. Michael Granitzer Optional: Modeling the Internet and the Web: Probabilistic Methods and Algorithms, Pierre Baldi, Paolo Frasconi, Padhraic Smyth, Wiley, 2003 (Chapter 4, Text Analysis)

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ECS Teaching Handbook
This handbook, nominally chapter 3 of the ECS staff handbook, describes ECS educational policy and procedures, as defined and agreed by the school via its various boards and committees. There are sections covering our educational aims and strategy, processes and structures, teaching and learning, pastoral and administrative arrangements, and a glossary. The material here supplements that in the University's quality handbook. (This is the working document which will become our 2009/10 handbook next academic year.)

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H

Renssellaer Institute. Jim Hendler. CSCI 4964/COMM 49652 – Web Science. Social Network
Social Networks on the World Wide Web - lecture by Dr. Jennifer Golbeck

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Work-life balance - You've never had it so good??
Gives some personal reflections on work-life balance in both services and in academic research. Over the last few years both childcare and working practices have changed for the better. I hope this will stimulate discussion with the contributions from other academics at the WiSET discussion session.

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Introduction to Network Mathematics
Introduction to Network Mathematics provides college students with basic graph theory to better understand the Internet

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K

And 18 more...
Networked Life: Module CIS 112, University of Pennsylvania, Spring 2008
What kind of science is appropriate for understanding the Facebook? How does Google find what you're looking for... ...and exactly how do they make money doing so? What structural properties might we expect any social network to have? How does your position in an economic network (dis)advantage you? How are individual and collective behavior related in complex networks? What might we mean by the economics of spam? What do game theory and the Paris subway have to do with Internet routing? What's going on in the pictures to the left and right? Networked Life looks at how our world is connected -- socially, economically, strategically and technologically -- and why it matters. The answers to the questions above are related. They have been the subject of a fascinating intersection of disciplines including computer science, physics, psychology, mathematics, economics and finance. Researchers from these areas all strive to quantify and explain the growing complexity and connectivity of the world around us, and they have begun to develop a rich new science along the way. Networked Life will explore recent scientific efforts to explain social, economic and technological structures -- and the way these structures interact -- on many different scales, from the behavior of individuals or small groups to that of complex networks such as the Internet and the global economy. This course covers computer science topics and other material that is mathematical, but all material will be presented in a way that is accessible to an educated audience with or without a strong technical background. The course is open to all majors and all levels, and is taught accordingly. There will be ample opportunities for those of a quantitative bent to dig deeper into the topics we examine. The majority of the course is grounded in scientific and mathematical findings of the past two decades or less.

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M

Assignment on Carrier Communications Simulation
Simulation of AM, QAM, complex QAM, 4QAM and 16QAM carrier communication schemes in Matlab.

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Assignment on Matlab
Considers sampling, quantisation, filters and lines of best fit.

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Lecture on Carrier Communications Simulation
Discusses the influence of Nyquist sampling theory on carrier communication simulations.

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O

Cloudworks
Cloudworks allows you to find other people's learning and teaching ideas, designs and experiences as well as sharing your own. You can also get access to many learning design tools and resources to help you create learning designs.

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S

TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 13: Web Technologies 2 - The Semantic Web
The semantic web represents a current research effort to increase the capability of machines to make sense of content on the web. In this class, Peter Scheir will give a guest lecture on the basic principles underlying the semantic web vision, including RDF, OWL and other standards.

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 1
In this class, we will discuss the course organization and provide a basic motivation for and introduction to the course. Readings: Web science: a provocative invitation to computer science, B. Shneiderman, Communications of the ACM 50 25--27 (2007) [Web link] Readings: Chapter 1 & 2, A Framework for Web Science, T. Berners-Lee and W. Hall and J. A. Hendler and K. O'Hara and N. Shadbolt and D. J. Weitzner Foundations and Trends® in Web Science 1 (2006) [Web link] Originally from: http://kmi.tugraz.at/staff/markus/courses/SS2008/707.000_web-science/

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 11: User Intentions and Intentional Structures on the Web
Search engines - such as Google - have been characterized as "Databases of intentions". This class will focus on different aspects of intentionality on the web, including goal mining, goal modeling and goal-oriented search. Readings: M. Strohmaier, M. Lux, M. Granitzer, P. Scheir, S. Liaskos, E. Yu, How Do Users Express Goals on the Web? - An Exploration of Intentional Structures in Web Search, We Know'07 International Workshop on Collaborative Knowledge Management for Web Information Systems in conjunction with WISE'07, Nancy, France, 2007. [Web link] Readings: Automatic identification of user goals in web search, U. Lee and Z. Liu and J. Cho WWW '05: Proceedings of the 14th International World Wide Web Conference 391--400 (2005) [Web link]

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 12: User Intentions and Intentional Structures on the Web II
In this lecture, we will focus on analyzing user goals in search query logs. Readings: M. Strohmaier, P. Prettenhofer, M. Lux, Different Degrees of Explicitness in Intentional Artifacts - Studying User Goals in a Large Search Query Log, CSKGOI'08 International Workshop on Commonsense Knowledge and Goal Oriented Interfaces, in conjunction with IUI'08, Canary Islands, Spain, 2008.

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 2: Small World Problem
We will discuss several examples and research efforts related to the small world problem and set the ground for our discussion of network theory and social network analysis. Readings: An Experimental Study of the Small World Problem, J. Travers and S. Milgram Sociometry 32 425-443 (1969) [Protected Access] Optional: The Strength of Weak Ties, M.S. Granovetter The American Journal of Sociology 78 1360--1380 (1973) [Protected Access] Optional: Worldwide Buzz: Planetary-Scale Views on an Instant-Messaging Network, J. Leskovec and E. Horvitz MSR-TR-2006-186. Microsoft Research, June 2007. [Web Link, the most recent and comprehensive study on the subject!] Originally from: http://kmi.tugraz.at/staff/markus/courses/SS2008/707.000_web-science/

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 3: Network Theory and Terminology
In this class, we will discuss network theory fundamentals, including concepts such as diameter, distance, clustering coefficient and others. We will also discuss different types of networks, such as scale-free networks, random networks etc. Readings: Graph structure in the Web, A. Broder and R. Kumar and F. Maghoul and P. Raghavan and S. Rajagopalan and R. Stata and A. Tomkins and J. Wiener Computer Networks 33 309--320 (2000) [Web link, Alternative Link] Optional: The Structure and Function of Complex Networks, M.E.J. Newman, SIAM Review 45 167--256 (2003) [Web link] Original course at: http://kmi.tugraz.at/staff/markus/courses/SS2008/707.000_web-science/

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 4: Social Network Analysis
What are fundamental entities in social networks and what information is contained in social graphs? We will discuss some selected concepts in social network analysis, such as one- and two mode networks, prestige and centrality, and cliques, clans and clubs. Readings: Web tool predicts election results and stock prices, J. Palmer, New Scientist, 07 February (2008) [Protected Access] Optional: Social Network Analysis, Methods and Applications, S. Wasserman and K. Faust (1994)

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 5: Affiliation Networks
How can we analyze and understand affiliation networks? In this class, we will discuss properties of affiliation networks and we will investigate the use of Galois lattices for the exploration of structural patterns in bi-partite graphs. Optional : L.C. Freeman and D.R. White. Using Galois Lattices to Represent Network Data. Sociological Methodology, (23):127--146, (1993)

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 6: Network Evolution and Process
In this class, we will discuss the nature of network evolution and some selected network processes. We will discuss graph generation algorithms that generate networks with different interesting characteristics. Optional : The Structure and Function of Complex Networks (chapter 8), M.E.J. Newman, SIAM Review 45 167--256 (2003); Optional: Emergence of Scaling in Random Networks, A.L. Barabasi and R. Albert, Science 286, 509 (1999)

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 7: Link Analysis and Search
What are ways of searching in graphs? In this class, we will discuss basics of link analysis, including Google's PageRank algorithm as an example. Readings: The PageRank Citation Ranking: Bringing Order to the Web, L. Page and S. Brin and R. Motwani and T. Winograd (1998) Stanford Tecnical Report

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 8: Web Technologies 1
This class focuses on a selected subset of web technologies that are of interest to the topics of this course. Readings: Chapter 5 "Representational State Transfer (REST)", in "Architectural Styles and the Design of Network-based Software Architecture", Roy Fielding, Dissertation, University of California Irvine, 2000 Optional: Chapter "Representational State Transfer (REST)" in "Pro PHP XML and Web Services", R. Richards 633--672, 2006

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 9: Metadata, Tagging and Folksonomies
In this class, we will discuss metadata as well as current phenomena such as tagging and folksonomies. Readings: Ontologies Are Us: A Unified Model of Social Networks and Semantics, P. Mika, International Semantic Web Conference, 522-536, 2005. [Web link] Optional: Folksonomies: power to the people, E. Quintarelli, ISKO Italy-UniMIB Meeting, (2005)

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T

Internet for Image Searching
"Internet for Image Searching" is a free online tutorial to help staff and students in universities and colleges to find digital images for their learning and teaching. The emphasis of the tutorial is on finding copyright cleared images which are available free; facilitating quick, hassle-free access to a vast range of online photographs and other visual resources. "This tutorial is an excellent resource for anyone needing to know more about where and how to find images online. The fact that it concentrates on copyright cleared images will make it even more valuable for busy learning and teaching professionals, researchers and students alike. It will also serve to inspire confidence in those needing to use images from the web in their work." (Sharon Waller of the Higher Education Academy).

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W

Annotating multimedia for community folksonomy and ontology building
This is an audio recording which introduces and summarises this project.

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Six Degrees: The New Science of Networks (Collective Dynamics Group ISERP -- Columbia University) Course Syllabus
Six Degrees: The New Science of Networks (Sociology, W3233, Spring 2006) Original URL: http://cdg.columbia.edu/cdg/courses/spring06/sixDegrees/syllabus.jsp

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W3233 -- Networks and Complexity in Social Systems (Collective Dynamics Group ISERP -- Columbia University) Course Syllabus
The Networks and Complexity in Social Systems course commences with an overview of the nascent field of complex networks, dividing it into three related but distinct strands: Statistical description of large scale networks, viewed as static objects; the dynamic evolution of networks, where now the structure of the network is understood in terms of a growth process; and dynamical processes that take place on fixed networks; that is, "networked dynamical systems". (A fourth area of potential research ties all the previous three strands together under the rubric of co-evolution of networks and dynamics, but very little research has been done in this vein and so it is omitted.) The remainder of the course treats each of the three strands in greater detail, introducing technical knowledge as required, summarizing the research papers that have introduced the principal ideas, and pointing out directions for future development. With regard to networked dynamical systems, the course treats in detail the more specific topic of information propagation in networks, in part because this topic is of great relevance to social science, and in part because it has received the most attention in the literature to date.

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Engineering Foundation Year - Sustaining Success - Lecture 1 - slides
These materials are used in student tutorials as part of the routes to success course. The tutorials are typically delivered to a large group (~50) in an interactive manner, with the slides serving as reference/check materials. Some of the questions in the slides can also be used as individual handouts

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This list was generated on Sun Oct 26 03:41:27 2014 GMT.