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Number of items: 13.

"Thematically Analysing Social Network Content During Disasters Through the Lens of the Disaster Management Lifecycle" & "Investigating Similarity Between Privacy Policies of Social Networking Sites as a Precursor for Standardization"
Abstract 1: Social Networks such as Twitter are often used for disseminating and collecting information during natural disasters. The potential for its use in Disaster Management has been acknowledged. However, more nuanced understanding of the communications that take place on social networks are required to more effectively integrate this information into the processes within disaster management. The type and value of information shared should be assessed, determining the benefits and issues, with credibility and reliability as known concerns. Mapping the tweets in relation to the modelled stages of a disaster can be a useful evaluation for determining the benefits/drawbacks of using data from social networks, such as Twitter, in disaster management.A thematic analysis of tweets’ content, language and tone during the UK Storms and Floods 2013/14 was conducted. Manual scripting was used to determine the official sequence of events, and classify the stages of the disaster into the phases of the Disaster Management Lifecycle, to produce a timeline. Twenty- five topics discussed on Twitter emerged, and three key types of tweets, based on the language and tone, were identified. The timeline represents the events of the disaster, according to the Met Office reports, classed into B. Faulkner’s Disaster Management Lifecycle framework. Context is provided when observing the analysed tweets against the timeline. This illustrates a potential basis and benefit for mapping tweets into the Disaster Management Lifecycle phases. Comparing the number of tweets submitted in each month with the timeline, suggests users tweet more as an event heightens and persists. Furthermore, users generally express greater emotion and urgency in their tweets.This paper concludes that the thematic analysis of content on social networks, such as Twitter, can be useful in gaining additional perspectives for disaster management. It demonstrates that mapping tweets into the phases of a Disaster Management Lifecycle model can have benefits in the recovery phase, not just in the response phase, to potentially improve future policies and activities. Abstract2: The current execution of privacy policies, as a mode of communicating information to users, is unsatisfactory. Social networking sites (SNS) exemplify this issue, attracting growing concerns regarding their use of personal data and its effect on user privacy. This demonstrates the need for more informative policies. However, SNS lack the incentives required to improve policies, which is exacerbated by the difficulties of creating a policy that is both concise and compliant. Standardization addresses many of these issues, providing benefits for users and SNS, although it is only possible if policies share attributes which can be standardized. This investigation used thematic analysis and cross- document structure theory, to assess the similarity of attributes between the privacy policies (as available in August 2014), of the six most frequently visited SNS globally. Using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, two types of attribute were measured; the clauses used by SNS and the coverage of forty recommendations made by the UK Information Commissioner’s Office. Analysis showed that whilst similarity in the clauses used was low, similarity in the recommendations covered was high, indicating that SNS use different clauses, but to convey similar information. The analysis also showed that low similarity in the clauses was largely due to differences in semantics, elaboration and functionality between SNS. Therefore, this paper proposes that the policies of SNS already share attributes, indicating the feasibility of standardization and five recommendations are made to begin facilitating this, based on the findings of the investigation.

Shared with: University

A Quiz on Privacy
Created for INFO2009 coursework.

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A data-driven approach to disease control
As our world becomes increasingly interconnected, diseases can spread at a faster and faster rate. Recent years have seen large-scale influenza, cholera and ebola outbreaks and failing to react in a timely manner to outbreaks leads to a larger spread and longer persistence of the outbreak. Furthermore, diseases like malaria, polio and dengue fever have been eliminated in some parts of the world but continue to put a substantial burden on countries in which these diseases are still endemic. To reduce the disease burden and eventually move towards countrywide elimination of diseases such as malaria, understanding human mobility is crucial for both planning interventions as well as estimation of the prevalence of the disease. In this talk, I will discuss how various data sources can be used to estimate human movements, population distributions and disease prevalence as well as the relevance of this information for intervention planning. Particularly anonymised mobile phone data has been shown to be a valuable source of information for countries with unreliable population density and migration data and I will present several studies where mobile phone data has been used to derive these measures.

Shared with: University

collection
Chuckle Brothers INFO2009 CW2
Resource, Poster and Reference for the coursework

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Dynamic Document Generation from Semantic Web Data
This talk will present an overview of the ongoing ERCIM project SMARTDOCS (SeMAntically-cReaTed DOCuments) which aims at automatically generating webpages from RDF data. It will particularly focus on the current issues and the investigated solutions in the different modules of the project, which are related to document planning, natural language generation and multimedia perspectives. The second part of the talk will be dedicated to the KODA annotation system, which is a knowledge-base-agnostic annotator designed to provide the RDF annotations required in the document generation process.

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And 9 more...
INFO2009 2012-13 Resource Group 15 - Web Science
Web Science - Group 15 created an interactive infographic which informs prospective applicants about the new Web Science undergraduate degrees offered at the University of Southampton, starting in October 2013. Web Science as a new and exciting field of research is also briefly outlined, supported by two video interviews with Dr Les Car, a web scientist.

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And 3 more...
INFO2009 2012-13 Resource Group 24
A short video explaining how the next generation of the internet will differ from the web as we currently know it and how these changes will affect a user. The possible problems with the transition are also covered.

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And 2 more...
INFO2009 2012-13 Resource Group 9; Augmented Reality: Past, Present and Future.
Augmented Reality: Past, present and future. An Educational Video on Digital Futures Awareness: Augmented Reality. Designed to be informative and entertaining.

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INFO2009 Group 8 Censorship
INFO2009 Group 8 Censorship

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The Age of Social Machines
Many of the most successful and important systems that impact our lives combine humans, data, and algorithms at Web Scale. These social machines are amalgamations of human and machine intelligence. This seminar will provide an update on SOCIAM, a five year EPSRC Programme Grant that seeks to gain a better understanding of social machines; how they are observed and constituted, how they can be designed and their fate determined. We will review how social machines can be of value to society, organisations and individuals. We will consider the challenges they present to our various disciplines.

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And 1 more...
The Digital Dream Team - Digital Divide (Group 4)
This vessel contains the poster and artefact link for The Digital Dream Teams' project

Profile PictureMr Douglas Moore
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The End of the World Wide Web
Nothing lasts forever. The World Wide Web was an essential part of life for much of humantiy in the early 21st century, but these days few people even remember that it existed. Members of the Web Science research group will present several possible scenarios for how the Web, as we know it, could cease to be. This will be followed by an open discussion about the future we want for the Web and what Web Science should be doing today to help make that future happen, or at least avoid some of the bad ones.

Shared with: University

User-Centred Methods for Measuring the Value of Open Data
A project to identify metrics for assessing the quality of open data based on the needs of small voluntary sector organisations in the UK and India. For this project we assumed the purpose of open data metrics is to determine the value of a group of open datasets to a defined community of users. We adopted a much more user-centred approach than most open data research using small structured workshops to identify users’ key problems and then working from those problems to understand how open data can help address them and the key attributes of the data if it is to be successful. We then piloted different metrics that might be used to measure the presence of those attributes. The result was six metrics that we assessed for validity, reliability, discrimination, transferability and comparability. This user-centred approach to open data research highlighted some fundamental issues with expanding the use of open data from its enthusiast base.

Shared with: University

This list was generated on Sat May 30 05:36:24 2015 BST.