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Number of items: 16.

10 easy steps to ease on-line communication
There are many different ways to communicate on-line now days from chat rooms, forums to e-mail, instant messaging, blogs and personal spaces. Some have clearly stated rules and some depend on unwritten codes of behaviour. Here are a few general tips provided that will hopefully make those occasions where learning and teaching are taking place more worthwhile.

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A Brief History of the Web
The Web is now so ingrained in our lives that it is easy to forget that it is less than twenty years old. But the History of Web goes back much further, to the pioneering technologists who built the first hypertext systems and the men and women before them who imagined great libraries of interconnected information that would augment human intellect and drive civilization forward. In this lecture we will explore the pre-digital origins of the Web, look at how it developed into the mass communication system we have today, and speculate on the next stages of its evolution in the context of Web Science and Social Media.

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A Quiz on Privacy
Created for INFO2009 coursework.

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Common Craft
Common craft make short videos which explain in simple terms some common concepts and technologies used in learning and teaching. These are available through The Common Craft Store, which offers versions of videos that are: Downloadable files Presentation-quality Licensed for workplace use You can find the free, online versions of the videos on The Common Craft Show. Topics include phishing, RSS, wikis, Twitter, social networking, social bookmarking, web search strategies, social media, podcasting, sharing photos online and many more.

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Introduction to the Social Networking Systems Course
These are the Introduction slides for Comp6051 Social Networking Technologies. They outline the structure of the course, and give a (very brief) overview of the topics covered.

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Marketing Using Social Media - Tom Chapman - Headstream
This is a recording of a talk given on 12 March 2010 by Tom Chapman of Headstream, a marketing company who specialise in the use of digital social media to promote products and brands.

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On social networks and game theory, some research problems
Seminar given as part of social networking course, to give a brief overview of some applied examples game theory used in social network simulation

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Power and Influence
Like any form of human interaction and communication it is possible to view Social Media as a means for the powerful to influence and control the less powerful. But what is power on social media, how might we measure or affect it, and does it translate to the real world? In this lecture we will look at the philosophical definitions of power, and explore how it has been analysed in social networks and social media systems. We will also look at the characteristics of social networks that impact on power, including Homophily, Heterophily, CyberBalkanization and Thresholds of Collective Action. Finally we will ask what evidence there is that power in social media can affect what goes on in the real world, and explore some real and fictional examples of protest to see what the consequences of social media actually are on sometimes violent political debate.

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Privacy
Privacy is a concept that has been with us for hundreds of years, but it is relatively recently (the last 130 years or so) that it has been seen as something that needs protection as a legal right. Technology has presented many challenges to privacy, from the printing press to recording devices to communication hacking, but Social Media seems to present something new - a phenomenon of people giving up their personal information to an extent that would be considered extraordinary just a generation ago. In this lecture we look at attitudes and behaviors around privacy, see how social norms have shaped our expectations of privacy, and how we have come to trade our privacy for value, making complex (and sometimes ill-informed) risk decisions. We will also explore how people really behave on Social Media systems, to see whether we (as a society) should be concerned about modern attitudes to privacy, and whether there are any advantages that might balance that concern. Finally we look at how technology can be applied to the problems of privacy, both as a preventative measure, but also by aiding transparency and helping people to make better privacy decisions. These slides were updated for 2014.

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Review of Social Networking Technologies
These slides are the review slides for COMP6051 and COMP6052 Social Networking Technologies, and show the significant lessons learned for each part of the course, and an example exam question and marks scheme.

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Review: Social Media and Abstract Nouns
The revision slides for our Social Media course, contains major lessons learned throughout the course, and an example exam question (on trust).

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Social Media Analytics: Trust and Power
In this lecture for a second year interdisciplinary course (part of the curriculum innovation programme) We explore the scope of social media analytics and look at two aspects in depth: Analysing for influence (looking at factors such as network structure, propagation of content and interaction), and analysing for trust (looking at different methods including policy, provenance and reputation - both local and global). The lecture notes include a number of short videos, which cannot be included here for copy-write reasons.

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Social Networking Technologies: Project Launch
Students taking the 20 credit version of the course (COMP6052) will work in groups of 6 to develop and design a new social networking tool/application/website. The teams will work on their design throughout the semester, and keep a design and development blog that will act as a digital portfolio of their work. At the end of the semester they will also be asked to submit an individual reflective summary that will outline their teams objectives and progress, their part in its progress, and a critical analysis of whether or not they were successful. At the end of the course teams will be asked to pitch their ideas to an interdisciplinary Dragon's Den style panel who will expect them to not only have created something that is technical viable, but will also want to see other economic, social, legal and ethical factors taken into consideration. In this presentation we explain the structure of the group project, what is expected in the blog, and explore some potential ideas to help students understand the scope of the work required. The outcome of the group project does not have to be a fully working piece of software, instead we are looking for a well developed idea that contains enough detail to be convincing to the panel.

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The New Web Literacy
Web 2.0 is sometimes described as the read/write web, giving everyday users the chance to create and share information as well as to consume information created by others. Social media systems are built on this foundation of participation and sharing, but what is the mindset of these users, and are they quite so everyday as we might suppose? The skills and attitudes held by users can be described as their literacy, and there has been a lot of debate over the last few years about how to describe these literacies, and design for them. One field that has been changed radically by this notion is Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) where a fierce debate has raged about the potential of a new generation of highly literate digital natives, and Edupunks have argued for open and personal systems that challenge traditional models of institutional control. In this session we look at the arguments surrounding digital literacy and examine TEL as an example of how social media can change an application domain.

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The Web 2.0 Development Survival Guide
Building software for Web 2.0 and the Social Media world is non-trivial. It requires understanding how to create infrastructure that will survive at Web scale, meaning that it may have to deal with tens of millions of individual items of data, and cope with hits from hundreds of thousands of users every minute. It also requires you to build tools that will be part of a much larger ecosystem of software and application families. In this lecture we will look at how traditional relational database systems have tried to cope with the scale of Web 2.0, and explore the NoSQL movement that seeks to simplify data-storage and create ultra-swift data systems at the expense of immediate consistency. We will also look at the range of APIs, libraries and interoperability standards that are trying to make sense of the Social Media world, and ask what trends we might be seeing emerge.

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Trust
Trust is a complex philosophical, social and technical notion, but it underlies many of our digital interactions including e-commerce and collective intelligence. In this lecture we will look at how different disciplines, including Psychology, Sociology and Economics have come to understand Trust through the lens of their own studies, aims and goals, and will explore how computer scientists and software engineers have implemented trust models based on policy, provenance and reputation. We will take a closer look at both Global and Local reputation-based trust, and see how assumptions of transitivity and asymmetry are useful. Finally we will explore trust issues around the largest known store of human knowledge: the Wikipedia

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This list was generated on Fri Oct 31 05:36:09 2014 GMT.