Browse by Tags: web science

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An Economists View of Web Science
Social Networking explained by an economic model of cost and benefit.

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Art & the Web
A introduction to how artists and designers and using the web and adapting to the web

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand "Web Science" Lecture 1
Lecture 1: Introduction to Web Science Lecture slides and video by Directors of Web Science Research Initiative (Wendy Hall and Tim Berners-Lee)

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand "Web Science" Lecture 2
Lecture 2: Personal Privacy and State Interference Lecture slides and video by Danny Weitzner.

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 1
Lecture 1: The Pioneers and History of Hypertext (pre-WWW) Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: Bush: As We may Think; Engelbart: NLS and A Framework for Augmenting Human Intelligence; Nelson: Xanalogical Structure; Conklin: A Survey of Hypertext; Halasz 1987: Reflections on NoteCards: Seven Issues for the Next Generation of Hypermedia Systems; Berners-Lee 1994 The World-Wide Web.

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 2
Lecture 1: Contributions of Pre WWW Research: Open Hypermedia Systems Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: Industrial Strength Hypermedia: Requirements for a Large Engineering Enterprise (Malcolm et al. 1991); Towards An Integrated Information Environment With Open Hypermedia Systems (Davis et al. 1992); Unifying Strategies for Web Augmentation (Bouvin 1999); Hyper-G (Adapted from Lowe and Hall); OHP:A Draft Proposal for a Standard Open Hypermedia Protocol (Davis et al. 1996); XML Linking (DeRose 99)

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 3
Lecture 3: Contributions of Pre WWW Research: Spatial Hypertext and Temporal Hypertext Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: Spatial [SPATIAL] VIKI: spatial hypertext supporting emergent structure (Marshall, 94); Towards Geo-Spatial Hypermedia: Concepts and Prototype Implementation, (Gronbaek et al. 2002); Cyber Geography and Better Search Engines; [TEMPORAL] Anticipating SMIL 2.0: The Developing Cooperative Infrastructure for Multimedia on the Web (Rutledge 1999); Its About Time: Link Streams as Continuous Metadata (Page et al., 2001); Everything You Wanted to Know About MPEG-7:Part 1 (Nack & Lindsay 1999)

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 4
Lecture 4: Ontological Hypertext and the Semantic Web Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: Conceptual linking: Ontology-based Open Hypermedia (Carr et al. 2001); CS AKTiveSpace: Building a Semantic Web Application (Glaser et al., 2004); The Semantic Web Revisited (Shadbolt, Hall and Berners-Lee, 2006); Mind the Semantic Gap (Millard et al., 2005).

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 5
Lecture 5: Web 2.0 and Social Hypertext Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: What Is Web 2.0 Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software . Tim O'Reilly (2005); Web 2.0: Hypertext by Any Other Name? (Millard & Ross, 2006)

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COMP3016 Web Technology - Strand 3 "History" Lecture 6
Lecture 6: Where are all the links taking us: Web Science Contains Powerpoint Lecture slides and Hypertext Research Papers: The Literati (The Cyberspace and critical theory website) (Eastgate website); Pervasive Hypertext at Southampton and at Aarhus; Adaptive Hypertext - The Next Big Thing: (De Bra & Chepegin, 2004); Web Science: Creating a Science of the Web (Berners-Lee, Hall, Hendler, Shadbolt & Weitzner, 2006).

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COMP6037 - Readings
Attached are the readings from past and present COMP6037 lectures.

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COMP6037 Seminar 23 10 13: Science, knowledge and technology
Set readings 1. Sismondo S. (2009). The Kuhnian revolution. In An introduction to science and technology studies. p12-22 2. Ben-David J, Sullivan T. (1975) Sociology of science. Annual Review of Sociology p203-21 3. Clarke A, Star SL. (2008) The social worlds framework: a theory/methods package. In Hackett EJ et al. The handbook of science and technology studies. Cambridge MA: MIT Press p113-137 Bonus paper (read if you have time) 4. Mitroff I. (1974). Norms and Counternorms in a Select Group of Apollo Moon Scientists. American Sociological Review 39:79-95 • Aim to ensure that you understand the core arguments of each paper • Look up/note any new terminology (and questions you want to ask) • Think about your critical appraisal of the paper (what are the merits/demerits of the argument, evidence etc) In the seminar we will spend about 5 minutes talking about each paper, and then - building on the two lectures - discuss how these ideas might be used to think about the Web and Web Science. At the end there will be some time for questions and a chance to note your key learning points.

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Communities and the Web
What is a social network? How does an online community differ from a real world community? See also: Anne Hornsby, 'Surfing the net for community: a Durkheimian analysis of electronic gatherings' ch.3 in Peter Kivisto (ed.) Illuminating Social Life (3rd ed 2005). Libr ref HM51KIV. Graham Crow and Catherine Maclean, 'Community' in Geoff Payne (ed.) Social Divisions (2nd ed. 2006) HM821PAY.

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E-government / E-democracy
In what ways does the web change the ways we interact with government and change the ways we engage in politics?

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Foundations of Web Science: Introductory Lecture
An introduction to the "Foundations of Web Science" module that overviews the module itself, plus the context of web science at Southampton in terms of WSRI and the new Doctoral Training Centre.

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Foundations of Web Science: Introductory Lecture 2. What is Web Science?
Professor Nigel Shadbolt describes the emergence of Web Science Research Initiative and discusses the themes and topics that contribute to an understanding of Web Science.

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INFO2009 2012-13 Resource Group 15 - Web Science
Web Science - Group 15 created an interactive infographic which informs prospective applicants about the new Web Science undergraduate degrees offered at the University of Southampton, starting in October 2013. Web Science as a new and exciting field of research is also briefly outlined, supported by two video interviews with Dr Les Car, a web scientist.

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Identity is the new Money
Three things to think about and Three possible futures to discuss

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Individuals, Behaviour Change and the Web
A psychologist's description of the Web as an effective channel for inducing and promoting changes of behaviour in individuals. Demonstrates an experimental system called "LifeGuide".

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Introduction to Network Mathematics
Introduction to Network Mathematics provides college students with basic graph theory to better understand the Internet

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Law, The Universe and Everything. The Regulation of the Web
Web Science lecture about the impact of law on the web and vice versa.

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Looking at the Web Science 2009 Conference
The first International Conference on Web Science is taking place in Athens, concurrently with this course. The material here will allow you to get familiar with the conference presentations and posters so that you can write a summary of the conference from a particular topical perspective. (Both the attached HTML summaries are currently in draft form and need to have the preview images and metadata checked.)

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Mapping the Web
Different attempts to 'map' different aspects of the web. How do you impose some sort of high level understanding onto the Web Graph?

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Mapping the Web and Web Science
This tutorial material introduces an activity in which the students are asked to redraw Tim Berners-Lee's map of the Web to include Web Science.

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Methods and Methodology: COMP6049
Slides and exercises for class on methods and methodology to web science masters. Explores inter-disciplinarity and disciplinary differences

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Networks 3: Social Structures
A brief look at the post-industrial, network society, freed from manual labour and liberated from place.

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Posters for Web Science DTC Industrial Day
These posters were created by Web Science MSc and PhD students as a discussion point with representatives from the DTC Industrial Advisory Group.

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Renssellaer Institute. Jim Hendler. CSCI 4964/COMM 49652 – Web Science. Social Network
Social Networks on the World Wide Web - lecture by Dr. Jennifer Golbeck

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Research on Social Network Sites
A bibliography of research on Social Network web sites. The research contained below is focused specifically on social network sites (or "social networking" sites). Some of this is connected to social media, social software, Web2.0, social bookmarking, educational technologies, communities research, etc. but this is not the organizing focus and not everything related to these other topics is included here. This list is not methodologically or disciplinarily organized. There is work here from communications, information science, anthropology, sociology, economics, political science, cultural studies, computer science, etc.

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Social Networks and Actors
A discussion about Actor Network Theory

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Social Networks and Small World phenomena
Social Networking tools like Facebook yield recognisable small world phenomena, that is particular kinds of social graphs that facilitate particular kinds of interaction and information exchange.

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Study Skills: Precis and Argumentation
Society is catching up with the implications of the Web; its use is not straightforward and well-understood. Web Scientists will need to be able to handle arguments about equivocal perspectives on the Web's impact.

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 1
In this class, we will discuss the course organization and provide a basic motivation for and introduction to the course. Readings: Web science: a provocative invitation to computer science, B. Shneiderman, Communications of the ACM 50 25--27 (2007) [Web link] Readings: Chapter 1 & 2, A Framework for Web Science, T. Berners-Lee and W. Hall and J. A. Hendler and K. O'Hara and N. Shadbolt and D. J. Weitzner Foundations and Trends® in Web Science 1 (2006) [Web link] Originally from: http://kmi.tugraz.at/staff/markus/courses/SS2008/707.000_web-science/

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 10: Text Mining
This class introduces basics of web mining and information retrieval including, for example, an introduction to the Vector Space Model and Text Mining. Guest Lecturer: Dr. Michael Granitzer Optional: Modeling the Internet and the Web: Probabilistic Methods and Algorithms, Pierre Baldi, Paolo Frasconi, Padhraic Smyth, Wiley, 2003 (Chapter 4, Text Analysis)

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 11: User Intentions and Intentional Structures on the Web
Search engines - such as Google - have been characterized as "Databases of intentions". This class will focus on different aspects of intentionality on the web, including goal mining, goal modeling and goal-oriented search. Readings: M. Strohmaier, M. Lux, M. Granitzer, P. Scheir, S. Liaskos, E. Yu, How Do Users Express Goals on the Web? - An Exploration of Intentional Structures in Web Search, We Know'07 International Workshop on Collaborative Knowledge Management for Web Information Systems in conjunction with WISE'07, Nancy, France, 2007. [Web link] Readings: Automatic identification of user goals in web search, U. Lee and Z. Liu and J. Cho WWW '05: Proceedings of the 14th International World Wide Web Conference 391--400 (2005) [Web link]

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 12: User Intentions and Intentional Structures on the Web II
In this lecture, we will focus on analyzing user goals in search query logs. Readings: M. Strohmaier, P. Prettenhofer, M. Lux, Different Degrees of Explicitness in Intentional Artifacts - Studying User Goals in a Large Search Query Log, CSKGOI'08 International Workshop on Commonsense Knowledge and Goal Oriented Interfaces, in conjunction with IUI'08, Canary Islands, Spain, 2008.

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 13: Web Technologies 2 - The Semantic Web
The semantic web represents a current research effort to increase the capability of machines to make sense of content on the web. In this class, Peter Scheir will give a guest lecture on the basic principles underlying the semantic web vision, including RDF, OWL and other standards.

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 2: Small World Problem
We will discuss several examples and research efforts related to the small world problem and set the ground for our discussion of network theory and social network analysis. Readings: An Experimental Study of the Small World Problem, J. Travers and S. Milgram Sociometry 32 425-443 (1969) [Protected Access] Optional: The Strength of Weak Ties, M.S. Granovetter The American Journal of Sociology 78 1360--1380 (1973) [Protected Access] Optional: Worldwide Buzz: Planetary-Scale Views on an Instant-Messaging Network, J. Leskovec and E. Horvitz MSR-TR-2006-186. Microsoft Research, June 2007. [Web Link, the most recent and comprehensive study on the subject!] Originally from: http://kmi.tugraz.at/staff/markus/courses/SS2008/707.000_web-science/

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 3: Network Theory and Terminology
In this class, we will discuss network theory fundamentals, including concepts such as diameter, distance, clustering coefficient and others. We will also discuss different types of networks, such as scale-free networks, random networks etc. Readings: Graph structure in the Web, A. Broder and R. Kumar and F. Maghoul and P. Raghavan and S. Rajagopalan and R. Stata and A. Tomkins and J. Wiener Computer Networks 33 309--320 (2000) [Web link, Alternative Link] Optional: The Structure and Function of Complex Networks, M.E.J. Newman, SIAM Review 45 167--256 (2003) [Web link] Original course at: http://kmi.tugraz.at/staff/markus/courses/SS2008/707.000_web-science/

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 4: Social Network Analysis
What are fundamental entities in social networks and what information is contained in social graphs? We will discuss some selected concepts in social network analysis, such as one- and two mode networks, prestige and centrality, and cliques, clans and clubs. Readings: Web tool predicts election results and stock prices, J. Palmer, New Scientist, 07 February (2008) [Protected Access] Optional: Social Network Analysis, Methods and Applications, S. Wasserman and K. Faust (1994)

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 5: Affiliation Networks
How can we analyze and understand affiliation networks? In this class, we will discuss properties of affiliation networks and we will investigate the use of Galois lattices for the exploration of structural patterns in bi-partite graphs. Optional : L.C. Freeman and D.R. White. Using Galois Lattices to Represent Network Data. Sociological Methodology, (23):127--146, (1993)

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 6: Network Evolution and Process
In this class, we will discuss the nature of network evolution and some selected network processes. We will discuss graph generation algorithms that generate networks with different interesting characteristics. Optional : The Structure and Function of Complex Networks (chapter 8), M.E.J. Newman, SIAM Review 45 167--256 (2003); Optional: Emergence of Scaling in Random Networks, A.L. Barabasi and R. Albert, Science 286, 509 (1999)

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 7: Link Analysis and Search
What are ways of searching in graphs? In this class, we will discuss basics of link analysis, including Google's PageRank algorithm as an example. Readings: The PageRank Citation Ranking: Bringing Order to the Web, L. Page and S. Brin and R. Motwani and T. Winograd (1998) Stanford Tecnical Report

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 8: Web Technologies 1
This class focuses on a selected subset of web technologies that are of interest to the topics of this course. Readings: Chapter 5 "Representational State Transfer (REST)", in "Architectural Styles and the Design of Network-based Software Architecture", Roy Fielding, Dissertation, University of California Irvine, 2000 Optional: Chapter "Representational State Transfer (REST)" in "Pro PHP XML and Web Services", R. Richards 633--672, 2006

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TU Graz: Course: 707.000 Web Science and Web Technology: Lecture 9: Metadata, Tagging and Folksonomies
In this class, we will discuss metadata as well as current phenomena such as tagging and folksonomies. Readings: Ontologies Are Us: A Unified Model of Social Networks and Semantics, P. Mika, International Semantic Web Conference, 522-536, 2005. [Web link] Optional: Folksonomies: power to the people, E. Quintarelli, ISKO Italy-UniMIB Meeting, (2005)

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The Sociology of the Web
A sociologist's description of the Web as a socially constructed/discovered/encountered piece of technology.

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The Web Social
Sociology of the Internet and the Sociology of the Web

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Transparency & Privacy
The Transparency Agenda of the 2010/1 UK Coalition government promises to revolutionise government, public services and public engagement, by ‘holding politicians and public bodies to account, reducing the deficit and delivering better value for money in public spending, and realising significant economic benefits by enabling businesses and non-profit organisations to build innovative applications and websites using public data’, to quote the then Prime Minister. This is an ambitious programme with laudable aims, yet it naturally has limits.

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W3233 -- Networks and Complexity in Social Systems (Collective Dynamics Group ISERP -- Columbia University) Course Syllabus
The Networks and Complexity in Social Systems course commences with an overview of the nascent field of complex networks, dividing it into three related but distinct strands: Statistical description of large scale networks, viewed as static objects; the dynamic evolution of networks, where now the structure of the network is understood in terms of a growth process; and dynamical processes that take place on fixed networks; that is, "networked dynamical systems". (A fourth area of potential research ties all the previous three strands together under the rubric of co-evolution of networks and dynamics, but very little research has been done in this vein and so it is omitted.) The remainder of the course treats each of the three strands in greater detail, introducing technical knowledge as required, summarizing the research papers that have introduced the principal ideas, and pointing out directions for future development. With regard to networked dynamical systems, the course treats in detail the more specific topic of information propagation in networks, in part because this topic is of great relevance to social science, and in part because it has received the most attention in the literature to date.

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What is Cybercrime and what do we do about?
A guest lecture by Professor David S.Wall from the University of Durham. This talk will explore the way that networked technology has transformed criminal behaviour. The first part will map out cybercrimes and identify the challenges they pose for both criminologists and also regulators. The second part will show that cybercrimes are informational, networked and global. In this section it will also be shown that cybercrimes are highly disorganised forms of offending when compared to the organisation of more 'traditional' crimes, but display some new organisational logics of their own. The third part of the talk will illustrate how the 'culture of fear' that has arisen around cybercrime has placed demands upon government and police - demands that, for reasons related to the distinct nature of cybercrimes, are hard to resolve. The fourth and final part will look at the new policing arrangements that are designed, it is argued here, to close the reassurance gap.

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What is the Web? The Web Architecture
The Introductory Lecture is a discussion about "What is the Web". It involves lots of calling out TLAs and writing them on the blackboard, dividing things into servers, clients, protocols, formats, and the punchline is that the one unique and novel thing about the web is the hypertext link. This follows naturally into the Web architecture - the answer to the question "what is the web".

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What’s the Difference between Web Technology and Web Science? Opportunities for study and research at the University of Southampton
The University of Southampton has a long history of pursuing research, development and social change with the Web This document guides you through the opportunities for Web-related study and research that we offer: an MSc in Web Technology; a 3-year PhD in Web Technology; an MSc in Web Science or a 4-year PhD in Web Science

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Who Invented the Web?
It is received wisdom that Tim Berners-Lee invented the Web; but there is a lot more technology and historical context that plays a part.

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jhofman's data and networks Bookmarks on Delicious
A list of many network datasets

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This list was generated on Wed Apr 16 17:22:17 2014 BST.